ENG 1002: Essay 2 Guided Freewrite

This is post is geared toward planning and brainstorming the poetry essay in my comp. II class.

Essay 2 Guided Freewrite

Consider the social issue/movement and poem (or pair of poems) you plan to write about. Use this process to double-check your current plans, plan how to best research your topic, and how to best present your topic to your intended audience.

  1. Is the poem predominately about the social issue, or it is the social issue an aspect or layer of the poem?
  2. Identify some lines of the poem that best present your social issue. Underline them, makes notes about them, annotate why you the ways you see them representing the social issue.
  3. Do a quick Internet search–can you quickly find a resource such as an association, a foundation, or an organization dedicated to your social issue. Copy/paste a link for future use. If not, what other resources can you find?
  4. Consider your argument? What sections or types of paragraphs do you anticipate needing? Common paragraph forms: definition, comparison, analysis, argument with a call to action, proposed solution, opposing viewpoint, cause/effect, narrative.
  5. Based on your Internet search for question #3, what way can that source be used in your paper? Can it be used to define your social issue, provide a proposed solution, allow your audience to get involved with a related initiative? Is this information important enough to be an entire body paragraph? Where do you believe it would be best located in your paper? Or will it be part of a “call to action” in your conclusion, explaining the importance of making your audience aware of the issue?
  6. Turn to the library databases and see what kinds of articles are available? Most students use these for medical definitions (medical definition of depression), treatment options/outlooks (medication or treatments for depression), studies to provide statistical information (how many people are dealing with mental illness), or historical context/comparison (how social perspective has evolved/changed/stayed the same). Many students use these source to provide the more formal medical/scientific information.
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Essay 3 Library Article Info

This post provides information about accessing and saving articles retrieved from the IVCC library research database Academic Search Complete.

Expectations

Students in my campus and online ENG 1001 course are required to use citation from 1 Academic Search Complete-retrieved article in the body of the Essay 3 assignment.  Finding a comparable scholarly article from Google scholar or a different database will not meet the requirement.

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Writing Process Resource Link

This post correlates to my ENG 1001 “Intro to ENG 1001 and the Writing Process” lesson, but can be used as a resource for comp. II or literature students as well.

The Writing Process: what is it?

The Writing Process is something we focus on throughout English Composition I and II. 

  •  Good writer’s don’t create good writing the first time.
  •  On average, you’ll revise an undergraduate college essay 3-6 times
  • ­Sometimes more; sometimes less.

Here are the main steps we will use this semster:

  1. Prewriting or brainstorming
  2. Thesis Development and Outline
  3. Rough Draft
  4. Proofreading and Revising (peer-review and IVCC Writing Center)

Here is a quick resource link with this information; here is a more detailed resource link with this information.

The Writing Process: how to personalize it for you

STEP 1: Throughout your essay prewriting, drafting, and finalization, remember that The Writing Process is fluid: 

  •  It can bend and shift to fit your needs:
    • ­Imagine water filling a glass or a river moving downstream.
  •  If you’re reading and revising a draft and you realize you need to explain a point more:

    1. do a freewrite or brainstorm
    2. outline your new thoughts
    3. Add the content to your current essay
    4. Proofread and move on

STEP 2 : While we write, write, write this semester, pay attention to your success and failures:

  • ­Not necessarily your grade
  • ­The technique that was quickly for you
  • ­Note what you didn’t understand or hate
  • ­What processes make you write your essay faster or will less hesitation

STEP 3: When the semester ends, reflect on what worked for you and what didn’t.

STEP 4: Take the “useful stuff” with you and disregard the “not so useful.”

Resource Links

Quick link: http://cmsw.mit.edu/writing-and-communication-center/resources/writers/writing-process/

Detailed link: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/the_writing_process/invention_starting_the_writing_process.html

Prewriting: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/the_writing_process/prewriting/prewriting_introduction.html

Proofreading: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/the_writing_process/proofreading/beginning_proofreading.html

Revising: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/the_writing_process/proofreading/revising_for_cohesion.html

IVCC Writing Center: http://www2.ivcc.edu/writingcenter/index.html

Paragraph Development: ENG 1001

This post includes information about developing body paragraphs for analytical writing. It first discusses body paragraph development and then provides expectation for how to incorporate and use citation. I consider this a foundation skill-set involved in writing successful academic evidence-based claims.

PART 1: Paragraph Development.

In order to develop/write strong, logical body paragraphs, each one needs to include 3 parts:

  1. Topic sentence: one sentence that lets readers know the paragraph’s main point.
    • Doesn’t provide depth or example.
  2. Developing Sentences: 4-6 sentences, excluding citation.
    • Provides the description, example, or depth that explains your paragraph’s point to readers.
  3. Wrap-up (with optional transition): 1-3 sentences that end your point; may begin to transition to your next topic.

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Research Essay: Internet sources

This post provides information about the credible Internet article requirement of the Research Essay, specific to my ENG 1002 course.  Students are expected to use

General Suggestion: print the article(s) you believe you will use as evidence in your essay. Saving a link is fine, but having the printed copy will allow you to trouble-shoot Internet access issues and the event that a free sites moves to paid accounts.

Choosing Credible Sources

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Research Essay: Library Sources

This post provides information about the library database article requirement of the Research Essay, specific to my ENG 1002 course. Students are expected to use

General Suggestion: 1) copy/paste the permalink or document URL for each article you believe you will use as evidence in your essay 2) download/email yourself the PDF (when available) and 3) print the article. This will allow you to troubleshoot Internet access issues.

List of Commonly Used Library Databases 

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Body Paragraph Development: ENG 1002

This post includes information about developing body paragraphs for analytical writing. It first discusses body paragraph development and then provides expectation for how to incorporate and use citation. I consider this a foundation skill-set involved in writing successful academic evidence-based claims.

PART 1: Paragraph Development.

In order to develop/write strong, logical body paragraphs, each one needs to include 3 parts:

  1. Topic sentence: one sentence that lets readers know the paragraph’s main point.
    • Doesn’t provide depth or example.
  2. Developing Sentences: 4-6 sentences, excluding citation.
    • Provides the description, example, or depth that explains your paragraph’s point to readers.
  3. Wrap-up (with optional transition): 1-3 sentences that end your point; may begin to transition to your next topic.

Continue reading