Works Cited Page for ENG 1001

This includes information for the source-based essay assignments in my ENG 1001 course. First off, here’s the main page about “Creating Works Cited Entries” link from IVCC’s Stylebook, and here’s a sample Works Cited page. Note the hanging tab (that extra indented white space before the extra lines of each entry) and how all the entries are alphabetized. Here’s how to format a hanging tab.

Works Cited Page Examples

The below examples DO NOT include hanging tab formatting (that’s a nightmare for a blog) and are categorized as library database, Issues and Controversies database, and reputable Internet source

Be sure to check each essay assignment expectations for the minimum and maximum number of sources required.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Punctuation

Combining clauses (complete thoughts) can be confusing, and it’s, no doubt, something that scares most students. Okay, it’s something that scares all of us, and something the best of us get wrong from time to time. Here’s a list of commonly used punctuation scenarios as well as some additional resources listed throughout and at after the list. Many of these are simplified for example, but I’ve provided more detailed examples as supplemental resources as well.

Coordination:

  1. Complete thought + comma conjunction + complete thought.
    • I want to travel to Europe, and I want to see the Louvre.
    • List of conjunctions: FANBOYS: For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, So
  2. Complete thought + semicolon + transitional word + comma + complete thought.
    • I want to travel to Europe; in fact, I want to see the Louvre.
      Examples of transitional words/adverbial conjunctions: also, besides, instead, therefore, nonetheless, furthermore, for instance, likewise, in addition, for example, however, otherwise
  3. Complete thought + semicolon + complete thought.
    • I want to travel to Europe; I want to see the Louvre.

Subordination: 

  1. Complete thought + no punctuation + subordinating conjunction + dependent clause
    • I want to travel to Europe even though I don’t speak another language.
    • Examples of subordinating conjunctions: after, until, while, since, thought, unless, because, whether, rather than, provided that, where, wherever
  2. Transitional word + dependent clause + comma + complete thought.
    • Even though I don’t speak another language, I want to travel to Europe.
    • Examples of transitional words/subordinating conjunctions: after, until, unless, because, since, whenever, as if, rather than, while, since

Comma Boat (Subordination with Relative Pronoun Clauses)

  1. Complete thought initiated + comma + nonessential thought + comma + complete thought completed.
    • I want to travel to Europe, which will take years of putting money aside, to see the Louvre.
    • The sentence “I want to travel to Europe to see the Louvre” is the complete thought here, and the nonessential thought “which will take years of putting money aside” is floating in the sentence in a comma boat.

Other Comma Usage Scenarios

  1. Transitional/Introductory word + comma + complete thought.
    • Eventually, I want to travel to Europe.
    • On September 28, 2017, I published this post on my website, and I hope it helps some students with their concerns about punctuation.
    • Common transitional words: however, additionally, eventually, oftentimes
  2. Incomplete thought + comma + incomplete thought + comma + complete thought.
    • Even though I don’t have the funds right now, considering I am good at saving money, I want to travel to Europe.
  3. Use commas to separate a list; the final comma MUST BE USED when it helps clarify the means to readers:
    • I like dogs, cats, and rats.
      • the comma here is optional because reader won’t be confused by this sentence.
    • I like spaghetti, ravioli, and macaroni and cheese.
      • the comma here is necessary to help clarify the meaning because there are so many “ands”
    • I want to travel to Europe, drink coffee in the best coffee house in Paris, gaze into the eyes of Mona Lisa, and have enough money to bring my brother.

Dash and Colons

  1. Dashes are used to emphasize or define.
    • The sky was a deep shade of green–chartreuse.
    • The sky was such  deep shade of green–chartreuse–that I was worried whether I should take shelter.
  2. Colons are used to set-up a list or to answer an implied question, with a few stipulations:
    1. Use a colon after a complete thought.
    2. Do not use a colon after a words such as including or excluding.
    3. Do not use a colon after a verb.
    4. No colon used because of the verb and its not a complete thought: She ordered two shoes, three bags, and four pairs of Star Wars socks.
    5. Can use a colon because it’s a complete thought: Yesterday she ordered a ton of items: two shoes, three bags, and four Star Wars socks.

Resources (I’ll add some more): 

Sentence Patterns

General Punctuation Resource

Using IVCC’s Library Databases

This description is geared toward my online ENG 1001 students but can be used by ENG 0900, ENG 1002, and Literature courses, when relevant.

Logging into the Library Databases from Home

  1. navigate to the IVCC homepage
  2. below the “IVCC Students” column, click on “Library”
  3. click the icon that says “Academic Search Complete” (note that this direct link may or may not work)
  4. it’ll redirect you to a log in screen, you’ll enter 24611 + your student number + 01, and then enter your last name.
  5. you will then have access to research
  6. log in again if your computer remains idle for a long period of time or you navigate away from the library page
  7. NOTE: if it’s still not working, try a different web browser (Chrome instead of Firefox or Firefox instead of Internet Explorer) and make sure your computer is allowing “pop-ups” from the IVCC website

Continue reading

Failing Essays: ENG 1001

Well, if you’re reading this, it’s very likely you just received on F on one of my ENG 1001 formal essays. Know that it’s not thrilling to give an essay an F, and I’m well aware that it’s even more upsetting to receive one. Because an F on a formal essay makes passing my ENG 1001 course impossible for that semester, I am willing to work with students who are willing to make the effort to rework F-level essays. However, this is a one-time opportunity that can not be repeated by the same student.

An essay rewrite is a one-time opportunity that can not be repeated by the same student in the same semester. I have included alternative direction for online students in italics, when necessary.

Here are my expectations and guidelines for rewriting an essay that originally received an F:

STEP 1: You must contact me within a week of receiving your F to let me know you plan to rewrite the essay. If you turn in a rewrite without contacting me ahead of time, I will not correct it. 

STEP 2: Visit the IVCC Writing Center with your assignment sheet and turn in the writing center slip with your rewritten essay. Online students can utilize the Online Writing Center process rather than the face-to-face process. 

STEP 3: Turn in both the original F essay and your rewritten essay by the date we determine together during STEP 1. Online students will not complete this step and will jump directly to STEP 4

STEP 4: Upload the rewritten essay to the original essay’s assignment link.

Part of the reason I allow students to rewrite an F paper is because I understand and appreciate that it’s not often done just because students are trying to get away with something or simply misunderstood the assignment expectations. Often, an F paper results from a lack of time-management, life circumstances, or a concern about asking for help. I hope that the opportunity to experience what it takes to improve your writing process and see the difference between the first process and the second process, will allow students to learn from the situation WITHOUT it putting them an entire semester behind.

Essay Rewrites: ENG 1001

Students are able to rewrite one essay each semester and must choose to do so within a week of the essay being returned with feedback. When an essay is rewritten, I will average the two grades together to determine the new, replacement grade. I am willing to work with students who are willing to make the effort to rework essays that earned a lesser grade than expected for whatever reason; however, essay rewrites should go beyond simple grammar or citation updates to include updating sentence phrasing, clearer transitions between thoughts/paragraphs, better argument organization, and stronger use of quote sandwich formatting.

An essay rewrite is a one-time opportunity that can not be repeated by the same student in the same semester. I have included alternative direction for online students in italics after each step.

Here are my expectations and guidelines for turning in an essay rewrite:

STEP 1: You must contact me within a week of receiving your grade/feedback to let me know you plan to rewrite the essay. If you turn in a rewrite without contacting me ahead of time, I will not correct it. 

STEP 2: Visit the IVCC Writing Center with your assignment sheet and original essay; include the writing center slip with your rewritten essay. Online students can use the Online Writing Center process instead of a face-to-face visit. 

STEP 3: Turn in both the original essay and your rewritten essay by the date we determine together during STEP 1. Online students will not complete this step and will jump directly to STEP 4.  

STEP 4: Upload the rewritten essay to the original essay’s assignment link.

I include expectations and guidelines because it’s not often in the professional world that you are given a second chance, but seeing that this an educational setting, I hope a second chance in this situation will provide you the opportunity to experience and reflect on the changes to your time-management, writing process, and use of student resources that resulted in a higher essay grade.

Score BIG Details

This is for the 2017 Pilot Program. I have enrolled the following classes for competition: ENG 1002; ENG 1001-10; ENG 0900-01; ENG 0900-04. Here are the details as I understand them; provide din ENG 1002 “storytelling” terms:
The premise: a campus wide competition between 18-20 classes (some are still signing up).
The hero/heroine: you guys as a class!!
The antagonistic forces: the other classes; procrastination; motivation
The war:
  • You will receive email direction and more detail once you complete STEP 1 directions below.
  • Student scores should be updated in Blackboard by Friday morning each week.  On Friday afternoon each week the class leaderboard will be posted on the library’s digital monitor by the cyber cafe.
  • The deadline: student deadline for completion is November 21, 2017.  The program is designed for students to complete the activities on their own time throughout the semester, so the earlier they start, the better they will do in class and in the game.
The aftermath (what you and we win):
  • Class prize: Each class is competing for a class prize.  With the winning instructor’s permission and designation of a class period near the end of the semester, the Student Life Space and its gaming equipment will be reserved for the entire class period and refreshments will be served. The type of refreshment may vary depending on the time of day the winning class meets. A tiebreak is yet to be determined, but likely some sort of final class challenge.
  • Individual prize: based on highest points achieved. The tiebreak will be the first completer with the highest points.  If the student owns a vehicle the prize includes a gas card and a service at the IVCC automotive department.  If the student uses public transportation the prize includes a pass to the transportation system and a gift card to the cafeteria.
STEP 1 Directions:  log into your student email account and send an email to shd@ivcc.edu with “Join Score BIG” in the subject line. Include your K#, name, and which class/section in the email. When you are enrolled in the Blackboard for Score BIG you will get an email response giving them instructions.  Just for accomplishing the sign-up step from your IVCC email account you will get your first 5 point. Visit this link or the Learning Commons if you have trouble accessing your student email account.

ENG 1001 Online Course Rubrics

These rubrics are also available in our course Blackboard shell as well as embedded into assignment links. *Note, there may be small differences between these saved files and their embedded electronic versions. I reserve the right to update rubrics as needed but, in doing so, will not alter the intention of the assignment outcomes or expectations.

If you have questions about rubrics, my grading expectations, or have concerns about a grading mistake, please email, message, or visit my office hours. Please bring grading concerns to my attention as soon as possible.

Writing Process Rubrics

Formal Third-Person Essay Writing

Writing Process Assignments, including assignments such as freewriting, thesis/paragraph development, outling, and drafting.

Peer Review Process, includes a complete rough draft, 3 completed peer review handouts, deadline, and peer review reflection.

Essay Writing Process Reflection

Assignment Rubrics

DB Response and Participation Rubric

Journal Response