MLA Resources

This list is for ENG 1001, ENG 1002, and ENG 0900 students. It’s a compilation of many of the MLA citation and documentation resources posts to my website. You can also search my website for things like “works cited page,” the name of your essay assignment (“poetry essay” for example), citation sandwich formatting, or something of the like to see what posts show.

Citation and Documentation Resources

ENG 1001: English Composition I Resources

Citation Sandwich Expectations (how to incorporate citation into your essay body paragraphs)

Direct Quote Citation Example

Example Paraphrase Citation

Works Cited Page

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Score BIG Details

This is for the 2017 Pilot Program. I have enrolled the following classes for competition: ENG 1002; ENG 1001-10; ENG 0900-01; ENG 0900-04. Here are the details as I understand them; provide din ENG 1002 “storytelling” terms:
The premise: a campus wide competition between 18-20 classes (some are still signing up).
The hero/heroine: you guys as a class!!
The antagonistic forces: the other classes; procrastination; motivation
The war:
  • You will receive email direction and more detail once you complete STEP 1 directions below.
  • Student scores should be updated in Blackboard by Friday morning each week.  On Friday afternoon each week the class leaderboard will be posted on the library’s digital monitor by the cyber cafe.
  • The deadline: student deadline for completion is November 21, 2017.  The program is designed for students to complete the activities on their own time throughout the semester, so the earlier they start, the better they will do in class and in the game.
The aftermath (what you and we win):
  • Class prize: Each class is competing for a class prize.  With the winning instructor’s permission and designation of a class period near the end of the semester, the Student Life Space and its gaming equipment will be reserved for the entire class period and refreshments will be served. The type of refreshment may vary depending on the time of day the winning class meets. A tiebreak is yet to be determined, but likely some sort of final class challenge.
  • Individual prize: based on highest points achieved. The tiebreak will be the first completer with the highest points.  If the student owns a vehicle the prize includes a gas card and a service at the IVCC automotive department.  If the student uses public transportation the prize includes a pass to the transportation system and a gift card to the cafeteria.
STEP 1 Directions:  log into your student email account and send an email to shd@ivcc.edu with “Join Score BIG” in the subject line. Include your K#, name, and which class/section in the email. When you are enrolled in the Blackboard for Score BIG you will get an email response giving them instructions.  Just for accomplishing the sign-up step from your IVCC email account you will get your first 5 point. Visit this link or the Learning Commons if you have trouble accessing your student email account.

Research Essay Library Resources

For most students, being tasked with a research essay is always a daunting and scary task. Research can be tricky if you’re new to the expectation, so please be sure to use the resources I’m providing and reach out for assistance when needed.

NOTE: students who use these resources spend much less time worrying about, generally freaking out about, or completely redoing research, even though the video feels like a time commitment. Every semester I read student reflections about their research essays that mention they should have spent more time using the provided resources; some of them even discover them a few days before the essay due date and end up reworking their entire paper as a result.

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Citation Sandwich Expectations

This can be used as an example for my ENG 1001 and ENG 1002 essays. And while I’ll be specifically grading for citation sandwiches, sandwiching your evidence within your body paragraphs in the way I’ve outlined below will bring a couple key things to your academic writing:

  1. Academic Authority: providing appropriate signal phrases and explanation will show readers that you’re using credible and relevant sources that fit within the context of your argument.
  2. Organization: preparing readers for what is coming with a topic sentence, signal phrase, and helping them see the connections that you’ve just made with your citation examples and wrap-up sentences will help them understand the content that you’re providing them. It’s like a little mini 5-paragraph essay within your body paragraphs.
  3. Grading: while my grading expectations include citation sandwich formatting specifically, I’ve simply named a common grading expectation the “citation sandwich” to make things more clear for students. Additionally, most IVCC English instructors use the department grading guidelines that looks for strong organization, thesis, and support within student writing, something use of citation sandwiches will generally provide your essay.

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In-text Citation Example

This can be used as a general in-text citation example for a direct quote. But don’t forget that every citation needs to be properly incorporated into your body paragraph/essay text, whether direct, paraphrase/summary, primary, or secondary.

Below is a default in-text citation sample, one mentioning the author name and one mentioning the character in question (useful for literary criticism/analysis). Both use a story we study in ENG 1002, ENG 1003, and ENG 2013 but with a fake page number:

The girl states, “will you please please please please please stop talking” (Hemingway 525).

Hemingway writes, “will you please please please please stop talking” (525).

And this is what you do if you’re using a database source that does not have page numbers.

The author writes, “that was the best scholarly evidence about Amelia Earhart’s disappearance I had ever read” (Smith).

Smith writes, “that was the best scholarly evidence about Amelia Earhart’s disappearance I had ever read.”

Accessing IVCC Library Databases from Home

When researching from a home for computer or one that is not using IVCC’s wifi while on campus, you’ll need to “log in” before you can access the library’s research databases. Here’s the process:

  1. pull up the IVCC library homepage
  2. click on the database in which you’d like to research
  3. it’ll redirect you to a log in screen, you’ll enter 24611 + your student number + 01, and then enter your last name.
  4. you will then have access to research
  5. log in again if your computer remains idle for a long period of time or you navigate away from the library page
  6. NOTE: if it’s still not working, try a different web browser (Chrome instead of Firefox or Firefox instead of Internet Explorer) and make sure your computer is allowing “pop-ups” from the IVCC website.

 

Primary versus Secondary Sources

First off, this description is specific to the Fiction Essay and Poetry Essay assignments in my ENG 1002 course, both face-to-face and online. Each of those essays asks students to use primary and secondary source citation to make a critical argument about a piece of short fiction or a poem/pair of poems.

Primary Source

The short story or poetry you are analyzing in  your essay. If your essay is about Disney’s Frozen, then Frozen is your primary source.

Here is an example way in which you can incorporate a primary source citation into your essay writing.

Secondary Source

The article(s) you use to support or make your critical/analytical claims about your short story or poetry. In most academic writing, the secondary source will fall into one of two categories (these categories will vary from instructor to instructor and assignment to assignment based on the assignment and course learning outcomes at hand):

  • academic secondary source: a scholarly journal article found via IVCC’s library databases, a reputable Internet article, streaming content from a TED talk or reputable podcast, and/or a personal interview. Many instructors will allow .org or .gov sites.
  • non-academic secondary source: Internet articles that may not have all of the WWWs, sites such as Wikipedia or Wikihow, documentaries from streaming sites such as Netflix (some instructors will consider documentaries as academic), social media posts, and most general .com sites.

You are expected to know what types of secondary sources are required for each writing assignment. And here is a link to the IVCC Stylebook ‘s “Using Sources” page with additional information about finding credible sources, representing sources fairly, where to use source information, and how to balance your writing voice with that of your sources.