Accessing IVCC Library Databases from Home

When researching from a home for computer or one that is not using IVCC’s wifi while on campus, you’ll need to “log in” before you can access the library’s research databases. Here’s the process:

  1. pull up the IVCC library homepage
  2. click on the database in which you’d like to research
  3. it’ll redirect you to a log in screen, you’ll enter 24611 + your student number + 01, and then enter your last name.
  4. you will then have access to research
  5. log in again if your computer remains idle for a long period of time or you navigate away from the library page

 

Primary versus Secondary Sources

First off, this description is specific to the Fiction Essay and Poetry Essay assignments in my ENG 1002 course, both face-to-face and online. Each of those essays asks students to use primary and secondary source citation to make a critical argument about a piece of short fiction or a poem/pair of poems.

Primary Source

The short story or poetry you are analyzing in  your essay. If your essay is about Disney’s Frozen, then Frozen is your primary source.

Here is an example way in which you can incorporate a primary source citation into your essay writing.

Secondary Source

The article(s) you use to support or make your critical/analytical claims about your short story or poetry. In most academic writing, the secondary source will fall into one of two categories (these categories will vary from instructor to instructor and assignment to assignment based on the assignment and course learning outcomes at hand):

  • academic secondary source: a scholarly journal article found via IVCC’s library databases, a reputable Internet article, streaming content from a TED talk or reputable podcast, and/or a personal interview. Many instructors will allow .org or .gov sites.
  • non-academic secondary source: Internet articles that may not have all of the WWWs, sites such as Wikipedia or Wikihow, documentaries from streaming sites such as Netflix (some instructors will consider documentaries as academic), social media posts, and most general .com sites.

You are expected to know what types of secondary sources are required for each writing assignment. And here is a link to the IVCC Stylebook ‘s “Using Sources” page with additional information about finding credible sources, representing sources fairly, where to use source information, and how to balance your writing voice with that of your sources.

Works Cited Page Formatting

This includes information for the Fiction and Poetry essays in my spring 2017 semester ENG 1002 class, but can also serve as an example for my LIT 2013 class. First off, here’s the main page about “Creating Works Cited Entries” link from IVCC’s Stylebook, and here’s a sample Works Cited page. Note the hanging tab (that extra indented white space before the extra lines of each entry) and how all the entries are alphabetized. Here’s how to format a hanging tab.

Fiction Essay Works Cited Page

Students are required to include the primary source (chosen short story), secondary academic source (Gale database article), and the editors of the textbook if you’re including information taken from the cultural context.

The below examples DO NOT include hanging tab formatting (that’s a nightmare for a blog) and are categorized as primary source, secondary source, and textbook cultural context

Primary Source:

Pond, Amy. “Traveling Through the Multiverse.” Literature and the Writing Process, edited by Elizabeth McMann et al., 10th edition, Pearson, 2015. pp. xxx-xx.

Gale content written by Gale editors:

“Blackberry Winter.” Short Stories for Students, edited by Iva Mark Milne, vol. 8, Gale, 2000, pp. 1-23. Gale Virtual Reference Library, http://go.galegroup.com/ps/ i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=uiuc_ivcc&v=2.1&id=GALE%7CCX2695500012&it=r&asid=b31b87705ad5123852 5a58424b977ab9.

Gale content written specifically for the Gale series:

Metzger, Sheri. “Essay on ‘A Doll’s House.'” Drama for Students, edited by David Galens and Lynn Spampinato, vol. 1, Gale, 1998, pp. 116-19. Gale Virtual Reference Library, go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=uiuc_ivcc&v=2.1&id=GALE%7CCX2692600 015&it=r&asid=3a27b5a54fefb19b5aec945fc4bfa233.

Gale content originally published in a journal:

Vedder, William. “Who is Jane?: The Intricate Feminism of Charlotte Perkins Gilman.” Short Story Criticism, edited by Lawrence J. Trudeau, vol. 182, 2013, pp. 231-49. Short Story Criticism Online, go.galegroup.com/ps/ i.do?p=LCO&sw=w&u=uiuc_ivcc&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7COLPTFD849176101&asid=1fbf9212e6f c789a9206e1f72d7dae5c. Originally published in Arizona Quarterly, vol. 44, 1988, pp. 40-79.

Gale content originally published in a book:

Vernado, S. L. “The Idea of the Numinous in Gothic Literature.” Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism, edited by Jennifer Baise, vol. 85, Gale, 1999, pp. 328-34. Literature Criticism Online, go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=LCO&sw=w&u=uiuc_ivcc&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7CIOGEAM8 67694925&asid=1659d5f4bf66b42ec0be0e570c3503eb. Originally published in The Gothic Imagination: Essays in Dark Romanticism, edited by G. R. Thompson, Washington State UP, 1974, pp. 11-21

Content from textbook’s cultural context:

McMann, Elizabeth et al., eds. Literature and the Writing Process, 10th edition, Pearson, 2015. pp. xxx-xx

Poetry Essay Works Cited Page

Students are expected to use one or two primary sources (your chosen poem(s)) that come from either our textbook or Poetry FoundationAdditionally, students must find a scholarly journal article from one of the library’s databases and an article from a reputable Internet source (there’s a list in Blackboard but common ones include Slate Magazine, The Atlantic, The Guardian).

The below examples DO NOT include hanging tab formatting (that’s a nightmare for a blog) and are categories as primary source, secondary source, and textbook cultural context

Primary Source from textbook:

Pond, Amy. “Traveling Through the Multiverse.” Literature and the Writing Process, edited by Elizabeth McMann et al., 10th edition, Pearson, 2015. pp. xxx-xx.

Primary Source from Poetry Foundation:

Of-the-Southern-Isles, Hans. “My Frozen Heart.” Poetry Foundation, date last updated, url.

Secondary Reputable Internet Source:

Jasmine, Princess. “Because He Freed the Genie.” Slate Magazine, date last updated, url.

Academic Search Complete or Proquest

Granger, Hermione. “Evil Stops With Good.” Magical Wisdom Medical Associationvol. 5 issue 6, 2009. pp. 882-98. Academic Search Complete, url.

Issues and Controversies Secondary Source Article

Scully, William. “Grandson of CSM and Son of Spooky.” Issues & Controversies, 1999, url

Gale content written by Gale editors:

“Blackberry Winter.” Short Stories for Students, edited by Iva Mark Milne, vol. 8, Gale, 2000, pp. 1-23. Gale Virtual Reference Library, http://go.galegroup.com/ps/ i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=uiuc_ivcc&v=2.1&id=GALE%7CCX2695500012&it=r&asid=b31b87705ad5123852 5a58424b977ab9.

Gale content written specifically for the Gale series:

Metzger, Sheri. “Essay on ‘A Doll’s House.'” Drama for Students, edited by David Galens and Lynn Spampinato, vol. 1, Gale, 1998, pp. 116-19. Gale Virtual Reference Library, go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=uiuc_ivcc&v=2.1&id=GALE%7CCX2692600 015&it=r&asid=3a27b5a54fefb19b5aec945fc4bfa233.

Gale content originally published in a book:

Vernado, S. L. “The Idea of the Numinous in Gothic Literature.” Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism, edited by Jennifer Baise, vol. 85, Gale, 1999, pp. 328-34. Literature Criticism Online, go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=LCO&sw=w&u=uiuc_ivcc&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7CIOGEAM8 67694925&asid=1659d5f4bf66b42ec0be0e570c3503eb. Originally published in The Gothic Imagination: Essays in Dark Romanticism, edited by G. R. Thompson, Washington State UP, 1974, pp. 11-21

Gale content originally published in a journal:

Vedder, William. “Who is Jane?: The Intricate Feminism of Charlotte Perkins Gilman.” Short Story Criticism, edited by Lawrence J. Trudeau, vol. 182, 2013, pp. 231-49. Short Story Criticism Online, go.galegroup.com/ps/ i.do?p=LCO&sw=w&u=uiuc_ivcc&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7COLPTFD849176101&asid=1fbf9212e6f c789a9206e1f72d7dae5c. Originally published in Arizona Quarterly, vol. 44, 1988, pp. 40-79.

Content from textbook’s cultural context:

McMann, Elizabeth et al., eds. Literature and the Writing Process, 10th edition, Pearson, 2015. pp. xxx-xx

Fiction Essay Proofreading

While making the final revisions to and proofreading your Fiction Essay, be sure to check for the following:

Assignment Requirements:

  • Signal phrases attached to all quotes.
  • Quote sandwiches in body paragraphs.
  • Minimum of 3 quotes from primary source (short story) in essay body.
  • Minimum of 2 quotes from secondary source (library article) in essay body.
  • Two vocab terms used twice each.

Formatting:

  • Underline your vocab term.
  • “Title of Story/Article” in quotation marks.
  • Title of Journal or Database italicized.
  • Hanging tab indent on alphabetized Works Cited page.

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Fiction Essay Vocab List

A list of possible fiction essay vocab terms. Remember, you’re tasked with using at least two of these twice each in order to fulfill the expectation. In using your chosen term, you just have to include it within your language, no need to define the term (but that is okay as well).

Plot
Plot arc
Narrator
Exposition (expositional dialogue; expositional content)
Conflict
Crisis
Resolution
Flashback
In media res
Foreshadowing
Character
Character Motivation
Exposition
Foil
Internal conflict
External conflict
Protagonist
Antagonist
Main character
Round character / Dynamic character
Flat character / Static character
Setting
Geographic setting
Historical setting
Physical setting
Symbolism (symbol; symbolic)
Parallel (parallel meaning; parallel conflict)
Narrative point of view
Point of View
First-person POV
Third-person POV
Third-person general
Third-person limited
Third-person omniscient

MLA Works Cited Page Resources

Here is a list of core elements required in the eight edition MLA style guidelines (from the IVCC Stylebook) as well citation resource links, citation generation links, and a sample works cited page.

Core Elements of Work Cited Entries 

Click the name of the core element for more information on it.
1.    Author.
2.    Title of source.
3.    Title of container,
4.    Other contributors,
5.    Version,
6.    Number,
7.    Publisher,
8.    Publication date,
9.    Location.

Sample Works Cited Page, from IVCC Stylebook

MLA Works Cited Page Resources

IVCC Stylebook Works Cited Page link, includes examples and links to core elements
Jacob’s Library citation page

Purdue OWL Writing Lab Works Cited page
IVCC MLA 8th Edition PowerPoint

Citation Generation Tools