ENG 1002 Online Course Rubrics

These rubrics are also available in our course Blackboard shell as well as embedded into assignment links. If you have questions about rubrics, my grading expectations, or have concerns about a grading mistake, please email, message, or visit my office hours.

Please bring grading concerns to my attention as soon as possible.

English Comp. II Online Course Rubrics

Discussion Board (DB) Response and Participation Rubric

Journal Response Rubric

Peer Review Process Rubric

 

ENG 0900 Final Grades

Spring 2017 final semester grades on Blackboard now represents the letter grade I’ll officially give you in the course (unless we’ve discussed an Incomplete or you’re still making up a writing assignment). Please note the following:

  1. Your FINAL GRADE is your RUNNING GRADE with any necessary reductions for absences (see the policy on my syllabus). If you have grading questions or concern, email or message me by noon Monday, May 15.
  2. IVCC only offers A, B, C, and F as final grades for ENG 0900, so you will receive an A in the course for any percentage from 94-100, you will receive a B in the course for any percentage from 87-93 and you will receive a C for any percentage from 80-86; anything below an 80% requires me to give you an F in the course.
  3. If you have any questions or concerns about grades, please notify me on or before Monday, May 15 at noon so I have time to make any necessary changes before “officially” entering grades to WebAdvisor. If you contact me with grade concerns or mistakes after Monday at noon, I will still be able to change a grade “in the system” (assuming the concern is valid and not too late after the end of the semester) but it will take some time, which occasionally slows transfers to 4-year institutions or enrollment in spring/future classes.
  4. I plan to officially post grades to WebAdvisor the morning of Tues., May 16. You should be able to view them “in the system” within 24-28 hours of that time.
  5. Here’s how you can view your final grades for this and previous/future IVCC classes by logging into WebAdvisor.

Final Grades and Degree Progress

IVCC final semester grades, GPA and degree progress information is on WebAdvisor as well as information about any courses you’ve transfer here from other institutions. Many instructors use Blackboard throughout the semester to post, tally, and show student grade progress, but Blackboard is not available more than a few days after the semester ends.

When looking for current or past grades, here’s the process; and please note that it can take 24-48 hours for a grade to appear on WebAdvisor after an instructor has officially posted it.

Viewing final grades and GPA:

  • Go to www.ivcc.edu/webadvisor and select WebAdvisor for Students.
  • Log in with your K-number and WebAdvisor password (it’s not your Blackboard password).
    • if you have never used WebAdvisor before, you’ll need to set up your account;
    • here’s the general FAQs page
    • go to the student help desk in the Learning Commons in D201 for one-on-one help.
  • Select the option “Grade Point Average by Term.”
    • sometimes it takes 24-28 hours after faculty post grades before they are available, so if you’re checking at the very end of the semester, you might have to check back a few times.
  • Enter the term for which you’d like to view grades.
  • This will provide the individual class grades, the semester GPA, the number of credits earned, and the number of grade points earned (used for GPA).
  • If a grade is not visible, it has not been entered or verified by the instructor. 

ENG 0900 Method of Assessment: Grades

Here is how ENG 0900 final grades are weighted in my based on category. This represents how Blackboard’s “running grade” is established and has been set throughout the semester.

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT: Final grades will be based on grades received on four (4) formal essays, grammar/style building activities, in-class writing responses/journals (including class participation peer-review and discussions). The break-down includes:

Summary & Response Essay 3 & Argumentation Essay 4 (3-4 pages)   . . . . 50%
Narrative Essay 1 & Definition Essay 2 (2-3 pages)  . . . .  30%
Writing Process Assignments  . . . .  10%
Journals/Grammar Assignments  . . . .  10%

GRADING SCALE:

A = 94-100%

B = 87-93

C = 80-86

F  = Below 80

Key to Common Grading Feedback

Here’s a list of my commonly used ENG 0900 grading phrases and what they mean; those in blue are grammar and writing related and those in pink are structure, organization, or thesis related. The few green underlined comments are about citation and only relate to the last essay of the semester.

Explain more / add more depth: isolates a location in the essay that could use one or two more sentences to describe your meaning or other specific example.

Italicize / no italics: the title or name you’re referencing is in the wrong format; the title of website names or sources names such as The Atlantic or The Guardian should be italicized.

Move Thesis: your thesis is in a location other than the last sentence of your introduction paragraph.

No “I”: points out a location where you used singular first-person pronoun (I, me, my, mine) in a third-person essay assignment.

No “you”: points out a location where you used second-person pronoun (you) in a third-person essay assignment.

Needs clarification: sentence doesn’t fully explain your point; sentence is too vague.

Phrasing: the sentence reads in a confusing way, or the sentence isn’t using common English word order.

Proofing: points out a typo, a missing word, a repeated word, or spelling error.

Punctuation: the circled or referenced punctuation is incorrect.

Singular / Plural: the underlined words are not using subject/verb or pronoun/antecedent agreements.

Correct example: When someone (singular) is faced with failure, he or she (singular) has the choice to keep going or stop trying.

Incorrect example: When someone (singular) is faced with failure, he or she (they) have the choice to keep going or stop trying.

Too Short / Paragraph too short: Your paragraph doesn’t include the minimum 6-8 sentences as required.

Use quotes / no quotes: the title you’re referencing is in the wrong format; the title of an online article such as “When Internet Memes Infiltrate Physical Life” from The Atlantic should be in quotation marks.

Weak conclusion / needs part ___: the conclusion paragraph doesn’t feel convincing enough; you are missing part 1 (remind) or part 2 (how your points prove your thesis).

Weak introduction: doesn’t provide enough grounding information to prepare readers for your thesis or body paragraph content; oftentimes, simply repeats the same idea over an over in different language.  

Weak paragraph / develop paragraph more: points out body paragraphs that feel weaker than the rest of your body paragraphs.

Word Choice / WC: the word circled/highlighted doesn’t fit the context of the sentence or is the incorrect preposition.

Word Form: most often points out the wrong verb or pronoun form/tense; incorrect use of plural versus possessive; use of dangling modifiers, or incorrect homonym/homophone.

However, if you choose to rewrite an essay or are replacing a failed essay, please do not rely solely on my comments and feedback; I don’t point out each and every grammatical or mechanical mistake but those that show up “the first time,” most often, and/or appear to be distracting from your sentence/argument meaning the most.

Key to Common Grading Feedback

Here’s a list of my commonly used ENG 1002 grading phrases and what they mean; those in blue are writing related and those in pink are citation/documentation or argument related. While grading ENG 1002 essays, I usually point out grammar and mechanics mistakes/errors without providing a suggested correction. I do this BECAUSE students are then presented with a basic question: what is wrong here and what do I know about grammar/style that could correct it? Answering the question yourself or seeking help will promote learning more thoroughly than being given the answer. Additionally, this provides a more useful rewrite process for those who decide to turn in a rewritten essay.

Explain more / add more depth: isolates a section of the essay that could use a few more sentences that describe your point, citation’s context, or the connection that you’re making. Often appears near the end of body paragraphs.

Phrasing: the sentence phrasing in this highlighted/underlined area is confusing, awkward, or unclear.

Present Tense / Use Present: highlighting moments in the essay where the student does not use present tense to discuss the event of the story/poem. Unless pointing out a sequence of events or using the perfect tense, discussion of literature is done in the present tense.

Proofing: points out a typo, a missing word, a repeated word, or spelling error.

Punctuation: the circled or referenced punctuation is incorrect.

Signal Phrase: citation or paraphrase/summary isn’t attached to or introduced with a signal phrase.

Singular / Plural: the underlined words are not using subject/verb or pronoun/antecedent agreements.

Word Choice / WC: the word circled/highlighted doesn’t fit the context of the sentence or is the incorrect preposition.

Word Form: most often points out the wrong verb or pronoun form/tense; incorrect use of plural versus possessive; use of dangling modifiers, or incorrect homonym/homophone.

WCP: Works Cited Page.

However, if you choose to rewrite an essay or are replacing a failed essay, please do not rely solely on my comments and feedback; I don’t point out each and every grammatical or mechanical mistake but those that show up “the first time,” most often, and/or appear to be distracting from your sentence/argument meaning the most.

ENG 1003 Grading Criteria

Below is the grading criteria I use when assessing and grading formal prose writing assignments in my Creative Writing Course. Formal prose assignments include the Memoir, Crisis story, Dialogue piece, Reader Sympathy story, and Threaded Microfiction piece.

Formal Prose Assignment Rubric

Below is the grading criteria I use when assessing and grading formal poetry writing assignments in my Creative Writing Course. Formal poetry assignments assignments include the Object poem, Childhood poem, Photo or Confessional poem, Protest or Meditation poem, and a Misc. Poem.

Formal Poetry Assignment Rubric

Additionally, each formal prose and poetry assignment will be workshopped in small groups using this rubric:

Workshop Participation and Reflection Rubric