Punctuation

Combining clauses (complete thoughts) can be confusing, and it’s, no doubt, something that scares most students. Okay, it’s something that scares all of us, and something the best of us get wrong from time to time. Here’s a list of commonly used punctuation scenarios as well as some additional resources listed throughout and at after the list. Many of these are simplified for example, but I’ve provided more detailed examples as supplemental resources as well.

Coordination:

  1. Complete thought + comma conjunction + complete thought.
    • I want to travel to Europe, and I want to see the Louvre.
    • List of conjunctions: FANBOYS: For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, So
  2. Complete thought + semicolon + transitional word + comma + complete thought.
    • I want to travel to Europe; in fact, I want to see the Louvre.
      Examples of transitional words/adverbial conjunctions: also, besides, instead, therefore, nonetheless, furthermore, for instance, likewise, in addition, for example, however, otherwise
  3. Complete thought + semicolon + complete thought.
    • I want to travel to Europe; I want to see the Louvre.

Continue reading

Advertisements